Doris Lessing

Doris Lessing

|British
date of birth : 22/10/1919 | date of death : 17/11/2013
Born on 22 October 1919,Kermanshah, Persia (now Iran),Writer, Winner of the 2007 Nobel Prize in Literature, Doris Lessing wrote across a range of genres and detailed the conflicts inherent to a changing society.

Birth, Birthplace, Time of birth:

Doris Lessing was born in Kermanshah, Persia (now Iran) on 22 October 1919.

Father's name: Alfred Tayler
Mother's name: Emily Maude McVeagh Tayler
Brother: Harry Tayler
Sister: -
Spouse: Frank Wisdom (civil servant, m. 1939, div. 1943, two children),Gottfried Lessing (German-Jewish emigrant, div. 1949, one son)
Children: Jean Wisdom, Peter Lessing, John Wisdom

Personal Information:

Race or Ethnicity: White
Sexual orientation: Straight

Life events:

Early life

Winner of the 2007 Nobel Prize in Literature, Doris Lessing wrote across a range of genres and detailed the conflicts inherent to a changing society. Doris Lessing was born in Kermanshah, Persia (present-day Iran), on October 22, 1919. After growing up in Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe), she moved to England and embarked upon a writing career.

Career highlights

Her first novel was published in 1950 and her 1962 novel The Golden Notebook turned her into a feminist role model. The author of more than 55 works spanning fiction, nonfiction, poetry and opera, Lessing became the oldest recipient of the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2007, at the age of 88. She died in 2013, at age 94.Doris Lessing was born Doris May Tayler on October 22, 1919, in Kermanshah, Persia (now Iran). Her British parents had met while her father was recuperating from injuries he had sustained in World War I. Not wanting to stay in England after the war, Tayler's father took a job overseas. In 1925, the family decamped to a farm in Rhodesia (present-day Zimbabwe), an endeavor that wasn't successful. After a difficult childhood, Taylor chose to leave school at 14. She held a number of different jobs—including as a nursemaid, telephone operator, office worker and journalist—before marrying in 1939. Tayler had two children with her husband, but felt stifled by conventional life in the suburbs. She soon became involved with Rhodesia's Communist party. After divorcing in 1943, Tayler married a fellow party member, Gottfried Lessing, in 1945, and took his surname becoming Doris Lessing. Four years later, her second marriage also ended in divorce. Along with her son from her second marriage, Lessing then moved to England. She brought a manuscript with her, which became her first published novel: The Grass Is Singing (1950). The book examined the relationship between a white farmer's wife in Rhodesia and her black house servant. Lessing would soon produce other notable books with African backdrops, including a series of novels that featured protagonist Martha Quest. However, the work that made her literary reputation was her 1962 novel The Golden Notebook, which centered on a struggling female writer. The book was widely read and embraced by the growing women's movement. Lessing's prodigious output also contains fantasy and science fiction novels—such as the series Canopus in Argos: Archives—as well as plays, short stories, essays and two autobiographies. She also wrote under the pseudonym Jane Somers. Using a different name permitted Lessing to demonstrate how difficult it was for unknown novelists to gain a foothold in the literary world. Throughout her life, Lessing rarely shied away from speaking her mind. She was barred for years from entering both Rhodesia and South Africa because she expressed her disapproval of white minority rule. Following the crackdown in Hungary in 1956, she turned away from Communism. The Golden Notebook may have transformed Lessing into a feminist icon. However, Lessing was reluctant to accept that role and during a talk in 1970, she suggested there was more to discuss beyond feminism, "I've got the feeling that the sex war is not the most important war going on, nor is it the most vital problem in our lives."

Legacy

Doris Lessing died peacefully at her London home on November 17, 2013, at the age of 94. The prolific author left a legacy of more than 55 works that spanned literary genres, weaving rich narratives of her personal experiences and political perspectives.

Education:

High School: Dominican Convent High School, Harare, Zimbabwe (dropped out)

Occupation and Career:

Doris Lessing was a British novelist and short-story writer. She lived on a farm in Southern Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) from 1924 to 1949 before settling in England and beginning her writing career. Her works, which have often reflected her leftist political activism, are largely concerned with people caught in social and political upheavals. Children of Violence (195269), a semiautobiographical five-novel series featuring the character Martha Quest, reflects her African experience and is among her most substantial works. The Golden Notebook (1962), her most widely read novel, is a feminist classic. Her masterful short stories are published in several collections. Other works include a science-fiction novel sequence, several novels published under the pseudonym Jane Somers, the volumes of autobiography Under My Skin (1994) and Walking in the Shade (1997), and collections of essays, including Time Bites (2004). She won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2007.

Awards /Honors:

  • Somerset Maugham Award (1954)
  • Prix Médicis étranger (1976)
  • Austrian State Prize for European Literature (1981)
  • Shakespeare-Preis der Alfred Toepfer Stiftung F. V. S., Hamburg (1982)
  • WH Smith Literary Award (1986)
  • Palermo Prize (1987)
  • Premio Internazionale Mondello (1987)
  • Premio Grinzane Cavour (1989)
  • James Tait Black Memorial Prize for biography (1995)
  • Los Angeles Times Book Prize (1995)
  • Premi Internacional Catalunya (1999)
  • Order of the Companions of Honour (1999)
  • Companion of Literature of the Royal Society of Literature (2000)
  • David Cohen Prize (2001)
  • Premio Príncipe de Asturias (2001)
  • S.T. Dupont Golden PEN Award (2002)
  • Nobel Prize in Literature (2007)

Books:

  • The Grass is Singing (1949, novel)
  • Martha Quest (1952, novel)
  • Going Home (1957, memoir)
  • In Pursuit of the English (1960, memoir)
  • The Golden Notebook (1962, novel)
  • Briefing for a Descent Into Hell (1971)
  • The Story of a Non-Marrying Man (1972, short stories)
  • This Was the Old Chief's Country (1973, short stories)
  • The Sun Between Their Feet (1973, short stories)
  • The Memoirs of a Survivor (1975, novel)
  • The Diary of a Good Neighbour (1983, novel, pseudonym Jane Somers)
  • If the Old Could... (1984, novel, pseudonym Jane Somers)
  • The Good Terrorist (1986, novel)
  • The Fifth Child (1988, novel)
  • Love, Again (1996, novel)
  • Mara and Dann (1999, novel)
  • Ben, In the World (2002, novel, Sequel to The Fifth Child)
  • The Sweetest Dream (2002, novel)

Death, place of death, Time of death, place of burial:

Doris Lessing died peacefully at her London home on November 17, 2013, at the age of 94. The prolific author left a legacy of more than 55 works that spanned literary genres, weaving rich narratives of her personal experiences and political perspectives.

Quotes and Memoirs:

“I've won all the prizes in Europe, every bloody one. I'm delighted to win them all, the whole lot. It's a royal flush.”
“I've always said that if I hadn't left that life, if I hadn't escaped from the intolerable boredom of colonial circles, I'd have cracked up, become an alcoholic. And I'm glad that I had the bloody common sense to see that.”
“I have nothing in common with feminists because of their inflexibility. They never seem to think that one might like men, or enjoy them.”
“Writing, writers, do not come out of houses without books. We are in a fragmenting culture, where our certainties of even a few decades ago are questioned, and where it is common for young men and women who have had years of education to know nothing of the world, to have read nothing.”
“I don't mind getting old. It's very interesting. I was always so busy I didn't have time to notice how utterly extraordinary life is, how utterly amazing. I'm continually amazed at—at everything, really. I'm just astounded at what we take for granted. We are extraordinary, you know.”
“I've got the feeling that the sex war is not the most important war going on, nor is it the most vital problem in our lives.”
References:
http://en.wikipedia.org
http://www.nndb.com
http://www.biography.com
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